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Teaching

ITASIA 201: Introduction to Media and Communication (Lecture)

A1A2 (October-January)

This graduate-level introductory course provides an overview of developments and approaches to media and communication studies. The first half of the course is comprised of lectures that aim to demonstrate methodologies and approaches to media analysis. The lectures broadly cover the following four areas: journalism and democracy, mass culture and cultural studies, internet and social media, and globalization and political communication. The second half of the class will introduce approaches to social media and data analytics, including web scrapping, API, and data visualization.

Topics:

  • Media & Communication Studies: An Overview
  • Media Archives: Discovering Japanese Media History
  • Interpreting the Past: Case Study and Textual Analysis
  • Media Representations: Approaches to Media Analysis
  • Understanding Audiences: Modalities of Media Pleasure
  • Idols and Affect in the Media Mix
  • Media Effects: Ethics, Regulation, and the Public Interest
  • Research Ethics for Media Studies
  • Television Advertising in Risk Society
  • Platforms, Algorithms, and Social Media Analytics
  • Web Scrapping and Data Mining
  • Data Visualization
  • Formulating Research Questions: Reviewing the State of the Field

ITASIA 202: Introduction to Media and Communication (Discussion)

A1A2 (October-January)

This graduate-level course provides an overview of theories and methodologies in media and cultural studies. Through a discussion of important works and scholars in media and cultural studies, the class aims to establish a foundation for understanding current theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of journalism and democracy, mass culture and cultural studies, internet and social media, and globalization and political communication.

Topics:

  • Introduction to Media and Cultural Studies
  • Structure and Agency in Media Worlds
  • The Frankfurt School and Culture Industries
  • The Semiotics of Popular Culture
  • Audience Studies and Media Reception
  • Democracy and the Public Sphere
  • Reproduction and Authenticity
  • Big Data, Surveillance, and Privacy
  • Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning
  • Mediated Communication and Interpersonal Relations
  • Precarity and Affective Labor in the Gig Economy
  • Life and Death in the Anthropocene

ITASIA 221: Gender and Media Theory

S1S2 (April-July)

This course is a graduate seminar on gender theory through select readings on the study of gender and representation in mass media, including film, television, manga, video games, anime and advertising. It will provide an understanding of current terminology and critical theories for analyzing gender through a survey of its most important scholars and influential recent works. The course draws on theoretical works from the field of gender studies, and includes additional readings specifically on gender and sexuality in the East Asian context. The course will provide instruction in analyzing, discussing, and thinking about gender in the media, with the aim of producing either literature review essay or an original research term paper that demonstrates mastery of gender theory.

Topics:

  • Sex and Gender
  • Body Image and Beauty Culture
  • Feminine Discontent and Body Dysmorphia
  • Gender Socialization
  • Queer Theory and Gender Performance
  • Social Media, Gender Identity, and Self-Representation
  • Motherhood, Work, and Family
  • Sexuality, Biopolitics, and Power
  • Scopophilia and the Male Gaze
  • Pornography
  • Romance, Melodrama, and Postfeminism
  • Abjection, Horror, and the Monstrous Feminine
  • Gender and Video Games

ITASIA 222: Social Media, Computer-Mediated Communication, and Mediated Publicness

S1S2 (April-July)

As we increasingly come to live our lives online in digital mediated spaces, the image of the self becomes more plastic, performative, and contingent. Anthony Giddens argues that the self in post-modernity becomes a reflexive project—an enterprise that we work and reflect on in order to fashion the story of who we are, how we came to be, and what we hope to become. Like celebrities in film and television, we have become the performers of our own lives for dispersed audiences across multiple media platforms. In the process, the distinction between our public and private lives becomes increasingly difficult to maintain, necessitating, like public relations, the careful management of our self-image. Our followers and friends become the audience in a staged performance that demands the constant cultivation of attention through self-disclosure, exhibitionism, and emotional labor. In digital spaces—with the intimacy of communication mediated by platforms, algorithms, and interfaces—how do we express feelings and immediacy, or pursue social and relationship goals? What impact does living our lives online have on our identity, self-esteem, communication, and sense of community? In this assemblage of the human and non-human, how are the social affordances of technology shaping our posthuman futures?

Topics:

  • Technologies of Addiction
  • The Social Power of Algorithms
  • The Media Interface
  • Influencers and the Branded Self
  • “An Amusement Park for Clinical Narcissists”
  • Affective and Digital Labor
  • Visual Communication on Social Media
  • Platform Studies
  • Object-Oriented Ontology
  • Media Infrastructures
  • Disinformation and Fake News
  • Platform Governance
  • Technology and Online Education